Part 1: Sketchnoter Types and Nib Size

Where do you fall on the spectrum of sketchnoting above?

  • Under-capture: You feel like you don’t write or draw enough. You might feel left behind or rushed. You consistently have trouble filling pages.
  • Balanced Capture: You feel like you can write and draw enough to fill a canvas without much issue.
  • Over-capture: You write and draw too much. You often feel rushed because you’re so busy trying to capture it all.

If you find yourself in the under- or over-capturing areas, there’s hope for you!

Think back to your school days and think about your notetaking habits. Were you a ferocious notetaker, hoping to capture every detail so you’d be prepared for tests? Or did you mostly enjoy listening and watching, only writing a few things down? How much you write and draw is often a natural habit that has carried over from school days… and it’s hard to change.

Instead of changing your natural writing/drawing pace, instead focus on this one factor:

Your marker nib size!

 

Under-capturers:

If you under-capture, get your default pen out. What size it is? What type? Try going up a few sizes or using a different type altogether. If you under-capture, you should abandon ballpoint pens and anything considered “fine point” and use something thicker. Try a marker or brush pen. It might feel too “elementary,” like using a crayon for a business meeting. The nib size will feel unnaturally large, but stick with it. Larger nib sizes will make your writing and drawings a bit larger and fill up more space, making it easier to fill a page.

Over-capturers:

If you over-capture, get your default pen out. What size it is? What type? Try going down a few sizes or use a different type altogether. If you over-capture, you should abandon markers, brush pens, and any tool NOT considered “fine point.”  Small nib sizes will make your writing and drawings so fine and precise that you can fit more in the same amount of space.

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